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Miscellaneous

Motoring journalists have been brainwashed to misreport on EVs

A trend I’ve been noticing recently is that motoring journalists, or people who have been involved in the motor industry for a significant time, don’t really understand EVs fully even if they like them and want to encourage their take-up.

Nico Rosberg, Jason Fenske (of Engineering Explained), Tiff Needell, Countless other motoring journalists and many more besides. These people are EV curious or already big fans, but because they’ve been so entrenched in the motor industry, they don’t really get EVs and what makes them different. They compare charging with fuel stations. They talk about range in a way that suggests everyday use means taking long road trips all the time, and that EVs could only possibly work for city driving. Which to me is ridiculous. I would never want to drive in a city if I could avoid it.

In some cases, they even talk about well-to-wheel emissions and compare EVs running purely on coal to just the tailpipe emissions of gasoline cars. It’s totally unacceptable and just wrong.This misinformation spreads like wildfire. People won’t be aware of how easy it is to live with an EV and charge at home, or charge away from home on all different types of chargers to suit different situations. They won’t believe that EVs are cleaner or they’ll think that they can afford to wait until solid state batteries because lithium ion is supposedly so bad for the environment.

If people who like EVs are inadvertently misrepresenting them, then that’s the least of our problems. We’re facing another year or two of having to fight off a toxic cocktail of misinformation and flat-out lies.

On the plus side, this situation will naturally improve over time regardless. So we can look forward to the day where we no longer get presented with false information by people who’ve just read something anti-EV on Facebook or some tabloid not worth the paper it’s printed on.

Categories
Miscellaneous

Will Geneva 2018 be the turning point for EVs?

No. It won’t be. It will certainly be big for EVs, but until we get to a point where 51% of the cars on show are EVs, then we won’t be there in my opinion.

However, in terms of public perception of EVs and the idea that they will take over entirely from fossil fuels, this may indeed be it. Jaguar, Audi and Mercedes will all unveil either prototypes or full production EVs. But I see this trend where people still don’t fully understand that EVs are here to take over. They think of them as an accompaniment to an ICE car. A second car for running errands around town. I’m hopeful that the I-Pace, e-Tron Quattro and eQC will change that. Tesla already should have, but many still have never heard of Tesla and seeing it from established luxury ICE car makers should make a difference. Perceptions won’t change overnight but I don’t think it will take that long.

Make no mistake, Geneva will be huge for EVs, but most likely 90% of the cars shown there will not be electric. Which for me will be deeply frustrating and depressing. It may take until 2020 before we get to that magical 51%. It may happen sooner, and I really hope I’m wrong, but I think 2020 is a reasonable assumption.

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Miscellaneous

The Weak Performance of EV Makers

Imagine Tesla selling only one car and not bringing anything else out or even announcing another car for 4 or 5 years. Then imagine that car getting almost no support from their sales staff. Then imagine the Supercharger network didn’t exist. Now imagine other companies who have infinitely more manufacturing experience and many more times the amount of money available to them. Yes, companies like that exist in 2017. It’s crazy to think about.

BMW are the first company I think about that fit the bill completely. But at least they’ve offered an EV of some description for years. How many companies out there have failed to even release a single one by now? See my last post for a very long list.

Categories
Miscellaneous

The Manufacturers That Don’t Make An EV In 2017

Here’s a list of the major car manufacturers that have at least 1 EV in their lineups in the U.K. in September 2017.

  • BMW
  • Hyundai
  • Kia
  • Nissan
  • Peugeot
  • Renault
  • Smart
  • Tesla
  • Volkswagen

And here’s a list of the car manufacturers in the U.K. who don’t currently offer a single EV in September 2017.

  • Abarth
  • Alfa Romeo
  • Aston Martin
  • Audi
  • Bentley
  • Citroen
  • Dacia
  • DS
  • Ferrari
  • Fiat
  • Ford
  • Honda
  • Infiniti
  • Jaguar
  • Jeep
  • Lamborghini
  • Land Rover
  • Lexus
  • Lotus
  • Maserati
  • Mazda
  • McLaren
  • Mercedes
  • Mini
  • Mitsubishi
  • Rolls-Royce
  • Seat
  • Skoda
  • SsangYong
  • Subaru
  • Suzuki
  • Toyota
  • Vauxhall
  • Volvo

Bear in mind that this is 6 years after Nissan started offering the Leaf, and around 7 years after Mitsubishi first brought the i-Miev to market.

So I think it’s fair to say that the current state of affairs is rather pathetic. Unfortunately, it seems as if Hyundai were the last of the early adopting manufacturers. It now appears the rest of the pack would rather wait until the end of the decade before bothering to release a single EV. I suppose we do know that Jaguar and Audi are coming to market in the next year, but that’s scant consolation.

In Frankfurt there were plenty of EV concepts but there was no Ioniq style announcement where they say it’s coming next year. Everything is coming in 2019 – 2022.

The Honda Urban EV stole the show. I’m a huge fan. But the question needs to be asked. Where has the 200 mile Jazz EV with ChaDeMo support been the last year or so? It wouldn’t be as headline stealing as the Urban EV, but it should have been built. They did a limited range Fit EV in the US and Japan, so at the very least we should have had a version of that in Europe. And by now it could have been upgraded in battery capacity as Renault have done with the Zoe Z.E. 40.